Silky Terrier Coat Breaking Through to Many Color

Published: 25th February 2010
Views: N/A

Silky Terriers have long, soft hair which is more human-like than other breeds and is not considered "fur" like most dogs, but a coat. When puppies are born they are black and tan. As they get older their color changes. This is called breaking. You will be able to see the color breaking through the black and tan at the roots of the hair. It will first be visible on their back, head and around their legs.



The Silky usually starts breaking around six months of age. If a puppy starts to change color earlier then that they will most likely be a silver or light blue. Puppies that break at an older age usually turn a dark blue. The Silky Terrier will keep the deep, rich tan color around their muzzle and cheeks, on their legs and feet, around the bottom of their ears and around their rear end area. The top of the head or topnot will be a silver or fawn color. You might have to wait until the dog is a year and a half before they are done changing color. At that time you'll know what color your Silky Terrier is going to be.



The adult coat will be silver, silver blue, pigeon blue or slate blue and tan. The blue starts at the base of the skull and extends to the tip of the tail. It goes down the legs to the elbow and halfway down the thighs on the outside. The tail is a darker blue then the other parts of the body.



The coat is long, silky, glossy and straight when mature. They do not shed because they have no undercoat. Their coat lays below their body outline and then follows it.



To finish the Silky Terrier look off, the hair needs to be parted from the top of their head, down their back and to the tip of their tail. The hair should not fall past the feet. Grooming will be required to make sure the feet are not covered up.



To learn more about Silky Terriers please visit www.silky-terrier-dog.com. This website provides tips on grooming, their behavior and so much more.

Report this article Ask About This Article


Loading...
More to Explore